Bible Reading Plan

In 2016, we will be reading through the Bible together using the One Story plan. Learn more about the One Story plan here.

Click the button below to start reading via YouVersion.

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Online Giving

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Sermon Audio

Listen to latest sermons here.

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Recent Bulletins

Stay up to date with current ministry activities and information by reading recent bulletins.

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Daily Devotionals

Read daily devotionals from C&MA founder A.B. Simpson, and A.W. Tozer.

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Service Times

 

Sunday School:  9:00 a.m.

Sunday Worship Service:  10:30 a.m.

Wednesday Night Ministry:  7:00 p.m. (various ministry for Children, Youth, Adults)

Thursday:  7:00 p.m. Corporate Prayer Meeting

Location

We are located at: 2201 Monroe Street Toledo, OH 43604 -Just south of the Toledo Museum of Art on the corner of Monroe & Collingwood Near the Collingwood exit of Southbound I-75

Upcoming Events

Sun 03

Sunday School

July 3 @ 9:00 am - 10:00 am
Sun 03

Worship Service

July 3 @ 10:30 am - 12:00 pm
Tue 05

Men’s Prayer Group

July 5 @ 8:30 am - 10:00 am
Wed 06

Men’s Prayer Group

July 6 @ 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm
Wed 06

Youth Group

July 6 @ 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm
Wed 06

Children’s Ministries

July 6 @ 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm
Wed 06

VBS

July 6 @ 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm

About Us

First Alliance Church has ministered to Toledo residents for over 120 years. Find out more about our rich history.
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A.B. Simpson Daily Devotional

July 1, 2016, 1:00 pm

Are we learning love in the school of suffering? Are our hearts being mellowed and deepened by the summer heat of trial until the fruit of the Spirit-love, joy, peace, longsuffering, gentleness, goodness, faith, meekness, temperance-is ripening for the harvest of His coming, and our sufferings are easily borne for His sake? This is the school of love, and the lessons make Him unutterably more dear to our hearts and us to His. In this way only can we learn with Him the heavenly charity which suffers long, and is kind. We see that the very first and the very last features of the face of love, as delineated in Paul's portrait of it (1 Corinthians 13), are marks of pain and patient suffering-suffers long, endureth all things. So let us learn in the school of love to suffer, to be kind and to endure all things. Surely it will not be hard to love through every circumstance when it is the heart of Jesus within us that will love and continue to love to the very end. I want the love that suffers and is kind, That envies not nor vaunts its pride of fame. Is not puffed up, does not discourteous act, Is not provoked, nor seeks its own to claim. After that ye have suffered a while -1 Peter 5:10

A.W. Tozer Daily Devotional

July 1, 2016, 1:00 pm

Instant Christianity tends to make the faith act terminal and so smothers the desire for spiritual advance. It fails to understand the true nature of the Christian life, which is not static but dynamic and expanding. It overlooks the fact that a new Christian is a living organism as certainly as a new baby is, and must have nourishment and exercise to assure normal growth. It does not consider that the act of faith in Christ sets up a personal relationship between two intelligent moral beings, God and the reconciled man, and no single encounter between God and a creature made in His image could ever be sufficient to establish an intimate friendship between them. By trying to pack all of salvation into one experience, or two, the advocates of instant Christianity flaunt the law of development which runs through all nature. They ignore the sanctifying effects of suffering, cross carrying and practical obedience. They pass by the need for spiritual training, the necessity of forming right religious habits, and the need to wrestle against the world, the devil and the flesh. Undue preoccupation with the initial act of believing has created in some a psychology of contentment, or at least of non-expectation. To many it has imparted a mood of disappointment with the Christian faith. God seems too far away, the world is too near, and the flesh too powerful to resist. Others are glad to accept the assurance of automatic blessedness. It relieves them of the need to watch and fight and pray, and sets them free to enjoy this world while waiting for the next. Instant Christianity is twentieth century orthodoxy. I wonder whether the man who wrote Philippians 3:7-16 would recognize it as the faith for which he finally died. I am afraid he would not.

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